Teaching Opportunities

The TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine is developing an innovative, evidence-based and pedagogically sound curriculum. Key components of the curriculum include organ systems-based courses (Phase I), longitudinal courses such as Clinical Skills, Preparation for Practice and Scholarly Pursuit and Thesis, the Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (Phase II), and 4th year selectives and electives (Phase III). While each curricular unit targets specific, and sometimes unique learning objectives and experiences, we have constructed a number of ways to integrate and connect content for students across the entire curriculum.

The School of Medicine, a candidate for LCME accreditation, is currently recruiting faculty to serve as small and large group facilitators for Phase I organ system courses and to serve as faculty in the Clinical Skills course. View the School of Medicine DRAFT Academic Schedule.

Current Positions:
Phase 1: Small Group Problem-based learning facilitators
Phase 1: Content Application Session facilitators (includes small group case-based and large group team-based learning)
Clinical Skills Cohort faculty
Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship Preceptor

Small Group Problem-Based Facilitators

TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine invites applications for Problem Based Learning Facilitators. The Problem Based Learning (PBL) facilitator will report to the assistant dean for curriculum with collaborative oversight by the individual course director(s).

What is problem-based learning?

Problem-based learning (PBL) uses small-group discussions of clinical cases as the stimulus for learning. It is a process that values students identifying and directing their own learning needs, fostering the development of problem-solving and life-long learning skills. To be successful in a PBL environment, students must develop team-learning skills and assume a very active role in their own learning. Educational research has consistently demonstrated that students from PBL programs retain the material they learn longer, perform well in clinical settings, and tend to enjoy their medical school experience more than their counterparts in more traditional educational programs.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Facilitators are assigned to a complete organ system-based course and requires 3-4 contact hours with  a small group of up to 10 students each week. Facilitators foster a student-directed learning environment by using a structured framework for problem-based learning that guides reflective inquiry and discussion. Facilitators also assess students by evaluating student performance in small groups, not only with regard to knowledge and critical thinking, but also in domains of interpersonal skills, teamwork, and professionalism. In this capacity, you will be responsive to the needs of students, faculty, and school leadership to ensure a high quality educational experience.

Most weeks, PBL sessions will occur on Mondays from 10 AM – 12 PMand Fridays from 9-11 AM. A mandatory debriefing and Just-In-Time Training to prepare for the following week’s case will take place each week on Friday from 11 AM – 12 PM.

PBL facilitators are required to attend one or more foundation training sessions as a condition of appointment and to undergo an orientation to the School of Medicine’s educational platform for the delivery of curriculum.

PBL Facilitators will be assigned to one or more courses, and facilitators must be available to open and close each week over the duration of the entire course or courses.

PBL facilitators will:

  • Facilitate Problem Based Learning (PBL) sessions two times per week during a course for Phase 1 Medical students in keeping with the PBL philosophy (student-centered learning);
  • Prepare in advance for PBL sessions by reviewing training and case materials on LCMS+ and attending weekly Just-In-Time Training;
  • Inform Course leadership of late or absent students in a timely fashion;
  • Inform Course leadership if there is a student who is underperforming with regard to preparation, participation or professionalism as soon as possible.
  • Provide one-on-one formative feedback to each student at or before the mid-point of the course and provide a summary of student progress to the course director;
  • Complete and electronically submit student evaluations within one week of the last PBL session of the course;
  • Utilize school and university technology resources consistently and independently, such as LCMS+, Examsoft, Microsoft applications to facilitate PBL and evaluate the students at the end of the course;
  • Facilitate all sessions of PBL for a course or courses. Courses typically last between three and 11 weeks depending on the course;
  • Meet at least annually with the Course Director to review composite feedback of teaching performance;
  • Complete the PBL Faculty Development Training for new facilitators before beginning to facilitate a block of PBL;
  • Participate in facilitator training/professional development sessions that are provided from time to time to further enhance facilitation skills;
  • Exhibit facilitation skills that promote an effective student-centered and student-directed learning process (rather than ‘jumping in’ to ‘tell’ or instill content expertise);
  • Model appropriate professional practice such as being ethical, honest, punctual and open to continued opportunities to learn and develop as professionals;
  • Adopt a continuous improvement approach to facilitation activities and proactively seeking support from other facilitators and the PBL Lead as required;
  • Conduct one-on-one feedback sessions with individual students as required during the course;
  • Be available for student consultation;
  • Complete and submit all administrative paperwork in a timely fashion;
  • Adhere to School of Medicine and Texas Christian University policies and procedures;
  • Support curriculum development;
  • Contribute as a demonstrator in workshops and laboratory sessions.

SELECTION CRITERIA

  • Master’s degree (minimum)
  • Experience in teaching medical students

Preferred

  • Prior experience as a PBL Facilitator
  • Completed postgraduate studies in teaching and learning

Qualifications:

  • Strong interpersonal skills with ability to relate to diverse students from a multitude of backgrounds.
  • Strong facilitation, observation, listening, and communication skills which can be deployed effectively in a small group learning environment.
  • Commitment to contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community

To register as a PBL Facilitator, please complete the PBL Faculty online interest form.

Content Application Session facilitators (includes small group case-based and large group team-based or other learning approaches)

Content Application Session (CAS) Facilitator 2018-2019 (CBL, TBL, and beyond)

The TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine seeks to recruit and train interested faculty to serve as small or larger group Content Application Session (CAS) facilitators. The primary role of CAS facilitators is to guide students through experiential learning and application of foundational concepts in medicine. Through these application sessions and exercises (e.g. via clinical cases, problems, formal team-based learning, or other modalities), students will develop critical reasoning skills as well as teamwork, reflection, meta-cognitive, and communication skills.

While novel approaches will continue to be developed, we seek content application facilitators who will:

  1. Guide groups of up to 10 medical students through case-based inquiry sessions in the Phase 1 Organ Systems Courses.
  2. Serve as team-based learning experts to facilitate team-based learning sessions, primarily in or working with another instructor in a content area of expertise.

Sessions using these approaches will appear irregularly throughout Phase 1, but CAS facilitators can anticipate spending up to 3 contact hours with students per week, with 1 additional hour of just-in-time training and/or debriefing for each session.

The academic year consists of a series of courses, usually 3-11 weeks long. CAS facilitators may elect to serve as long-term facilitators across a course and must commit to a total of about 4 hours per week during the course for which they are a facilitator; or intermittent CAS facilitators who attend CAS sessions relevant to their expertise and knowledge. Intermittent CAS facilitators will be appointed as volunteer faculty.

In addition, a significant and required component of the role is participation in faculty development sessions to learn the small group facilitation method used, and when relevant, content expertise. Participation in faculty development sessions is required regardless of the number of blocks facilitators choose to lead. Faculty development begins in summer 2019 (compensation will begin at this time) and will consist of two to three two-hour meetings along with additional meetings throughout the year.

Position Functions & Professional Responsibilities

  • Follow the course facilitator teaching guide to ensure consistency with all CAS sessions and to achieve the learning objectives for each session and course.
  • Participate in identification of learning needs of the medical student.
  • Provide constructive feedback to each student to remain on target with School of Medicine course objectives.

Application Process:

  1. Interested faculty must complete the CAS Faculty Interest Form
  2. Candidates will be asked to attach a current Curriculum Vitae to the application.
  3. Candidates will be reviewed by the School of Medicine Search Committee.
  4. Finalists will be identified by the Search Committee and invited for an interview.
  5. Final candidates will be notified of their selection and invited to apply for faculty appointment with the School of Medicine.

Clinical Skills Cohort Faculty

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

First year medical students in Clinical Skills Phase I learn the foundational skills of clinical medicine, including: eliciting a medical history, conducting a physical examination, compassionately communicating with patients, professionalism, and attending to personal wellness in clinical practice. The course begins with six weeks of focused skill in building a medical history, followed by skill in assessing and examining each organ system, and concluding with more advanced communication and care skills. Midway through the year students will participate in a formative assessment in which they will conduct a complete encounter with a single patient. In the second half of the year, students will learn how to apply their developing skills to more complex scenarios including those that call for integration of systems (e.g. cardiovascular and pulmonary; neurology and psychiatry), and more complex patient communication issues. This course takes place in the clinical skills center, which includes a suite of 18 simulated clinical exam rooms. Students and faculty will work with standardized patients (SPs) as one of the primary instructional methods in addition to didactic modules with small and large group activities.

JOB SUMMARY:

Clinical Skills Cohort Faculty Members will work directly with an assigned small group of first year medical students on a weekly basis as educators and mentors.

Responsibilities include:

  • direct observation of student encounters with standardized patients (SPs);
  • providing constructive verbal and written feedback to students on interviewing and physical examination skills and coaching students on oral case presentations and electronic documentation;
  • supporting students in developing clinical reasoning skills and modeling exemplary professional behavior;
  • support the Course Director and Assistant Directors to meet other course objectives for students, including developing professionalism skills and personal wellness plans as part of their clinical skills practice.

The Clinical Skills Phase 1 course is scheduled to be taught on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons beginning in July 2019. The course is scheduled for 39 weeks and spans most of the calendar year. Cohort Faculty Members may apply to teach on one or both days.

Cohort Faculty must be present from 12noon to 6pm on the day (dates) they teach. This includes an hour of preparation time for teaching, four hours of student contact time, and an hour to complete weekly grading and feedback to students.

Clinical Skills Cohort Faculty Members will report to the Assistant Dean of Clinical Skills Education & Innovation, who also serves as the Clinical Skills Course Director. Cohort Faculty Members will be expected to work collaboratively with other SOM faculty, Clinical Skills Education staff members, and the standardized patients.

JOB SPECIFICATIONS:

Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

The most successful cohort faculty members will possess excellent communication skills including facilitation and collaboration skills, as well as the ability to give and receive constructive feedback. Cohort faculty must be able to work independently as well as function as part of a team. Excellent time management, organizational skills, creativity, and flexibility are essential.

Computer proficiency:

Applicants must have sufficient computer skills to effectively utilize clinical skills simulation and curriculum management software, primarily for assessing and documenting observed encounters as well as providing written feedback.

Minimum Education/Training Requirements:

MD or DO degree with unrestricted physician license

Preferred Experience: Experience teaching learners in an undergraduate medical education setting or graduate medical education (residency) programs.

If you are interested in serving as a clinical skills faculty please apply online at: https://tcu.igreentree.com/CSS_Faculty/CSSPage_Welcome.asp

Scholarly Pursuit and Thesis Mentor

The Scholarly Pursuit and Thesis (SPT) course is a longitudinal course that is integrated through Phases 1-3.  The SPT course is designed to develop physicians who are life-long learners capable of critical inquiry and medical information literacy. SPT mentors will work closely with the medical student in mentoring students on a research project.  Research projects can come from any field as long as the students can propose a project that has been researched effectively, includes an intervention or examination, has a good plan for analysis, and discussion of the results with potential application and questions for the future.  Time with the medical student will vary from project to project. The mentor should plan to commit to working with the student over the four years. By the end of the SPT course, students will each write a capstone thesis and present their projects to the community at a research symposium.

Contact Mike Bernas, Director for the SPT course, to be considered for an SPT Mentor role

Current Faculty Positions https://tcu.igreentree.com/CSS_Faculty/CSSPage_Welcome.asp

Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship Clinical Faculty Job Description

Primary Care, Phases 1 – 3

Highlights

The TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine aims to transform medical education and prepare students to provide the health care of tomorrow. We are creating a curriculum that consistently and intentionally engages students in significant learning experiences through continuity with both patients and clinical teachers. Our longitudinal integrated clerkship (LIC) model is both patient-centric and learner centric; it is a progressive curriculum that enables students to maintain continuity with patients and expand their ability to understand and manage the contemporary complexities of patient care. Clinical teachers are essential members of the educational team and key role models for students. We will seek clinical faculty with an excellent reputation; the highest skill and regard for quality, patient-centered care; and a contagious spirit of learning.

As a faculty member for the longitudinal integrated clerkship (LIC), you are instrumental in shaping the student’s clinical experience from their first encounters (shortly after arriving to medical school) to the more intensive clinical phases of the curriculum. Through ongoing, longitudinal engagement with your student(s), you make key contributions to the growth of their skills as a clinician as well as their professional identity. For the student, being an integral part of your practice and caring for patients over time will foster meaningful continuity, connection, and contribution to patient care as well as to your practice.

Responsibilities

The LIC faculty member:

  • Integrates a student into their practice, as follows:
    • Phase 1: One half day every otherweek from late July through June, or about 20 half-day sessions (beginning in July 2019)
    • Phase 2: One half day per weekfrom late October through August, or about 40 half-day sessions (beginning in October 2020)
    • Phase 3: One full day (or two half days) per week from October through March, or about 20 full-day sessions (beginning in October 2021)

Ideally, a student begins in Year 1 (e.g. July 2019) and continues with your practice through Year 3 (e.g. March 2022).

  • Participates actively with the School of Medicine in the site review for clinical training approval.
  • Upholds all School of Medicine policies related to the Learning Environment expectations for medical students.
  • Collaborates with the Clerkship Director and The LIC Director to identify patients to assign to students that maximize their opportunity for clinical learning and address the learning objectives for each session.
  • Assigns patients to become a part of the student’s patient panel. The size of the student’s patient panel will initially be 1-2 patients (during Phase 1), expand to 4-6 (during Phase 2), and then taper back to 1-2 (in Phase 3).
  • Facilitates the student’s participation in the care of their assigned panel of patients whenever possible, in the office and when care extends to other settings (e.g. a specialty appointment, procedure, hospitalization, etc.)
  • Hosts and/or facilitates the student experience when student is following a patient into the clinical teaching faculty member’s setting (e.g. during hospitalization, procedure, or consultation)
  • Observes, provides feedback to, and assesses students in a timely manner in accordance with School of Medicine policy.
  • Reviews and responds to communications from the LIC director, clerkship directors, and LIC coordinator(s) to facilitate meaningful student learning experiences.
  • Communicates with the student’s physician development coach at the SOM at prescribed intervals (e.g. quarterly) and as needed regarding student progress.
  • Responds promptly to requests for information about student performance, including periodic written evaluations.
  • Proactively contacts School of Medicine staff and faculty (e.g., LIC coordinator, clerkship director) as needed to promote student safety and progress.

Minimum Qualifications

  • Unrestricted licensure to practice medicine in the State of Texas without adverse licensure board events
  • Board eligibility or certification in appropriate discipline
  • Active and continuing clinical practice site(s)
  • Excellent interpersonal, communication, and clinical skills
  • Qualify for faculty appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor or higher with the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Experience teaching medical students in a clinical setting
  • Experience and leadership in team-based delivery of health care

Other requirements:

  • Endorse and adhere to the School of Medicine Teacher-Learner Compact [Link]
  • Endorse and adhere to the School of Medicine Learning Environment Policy [Link]
  • Abide by all School of Medicine and university policies and rules of conduct [Link]
  • Apply for and achieve appointment to the faculty of the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine [Link]
  • Engage in faculty development

Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship Preceptor

Our Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC) model is both patient-centric and learner centric; it is a progressive curriculum that enables students to maintain continuity with patients and expand their ability to understand and manage the contemporary complexities of patient care. Clinical teachers are essential members of the educational team and key role models for students. We will seek clinical faculty with an excellent reputation; the highest skill and regard for quality, patient-centered care; and a contagious spirit of learning.

Clinical teachers are essential members of the educational team and key role models for students. We will seek clinical faculty with an excellent reputation; the highest skill and regard for quality, patient-centered care; and a contagious spirit of learning. As a faculty member for the longitudinal integrated clerkship (LIC) immersion, you are instrumental in shaping the student’s clinical experience. For the student, being an integral part of your inpatient team will foster meaningful learning about excellent patient care and the health care system.

As a faculty member for the longitudinal integrated clerkship (LIC), you are instrumental in shaping the student’s clinical experience from their first encounters (shortly after arriving to medical school) to the more intensive clinical phases of the curriculum. Through ongoing, longitudinal engagement with your student(s), you make key contributions to the growth of their skills as a clinician as well as their professional identity. For the student, being an integral part of your practice and caring for patients over time will foster meaningful continuity, connection, and contribution to patient care as well as to your practice.

The School of Medicine is seeking LIC Preceptors for the longitudinal outpatient experiencesas well as preceptors willing to precept students during scheduled inpatient immersion experiences.

Clerkship Specialties: Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Surgery

In Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Surgery, integrates a student into their practice one half day per week for about 40 half-day sessions.

In Obstetrics and Gynecology, Neurology, and Psychiatry, integrates a student into their practice one half day every other week for about 20 half-day sessions.

In Emergency Medicine, integrates a student into biweekly evening or monthly weekend shifts for about 20 half-day or 10 full-day sessions

These sessions will begin in about November and continue through the following August, beginning in November 2020. 

Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship Responsibilities Inpatient Immersion:

  • In Internal Medicine, integrates a student into their inpatient practice full time for three consecutive weeks.
  • In Obstetrics and Gynecology, integrates a student into their inpatient practice – primarily labor and delivery – full time for two consecutive weeks. Students will be assigned 2-3 women to follow throughout their prenatal course (e.g. during the remainder of the LIC), and this initial immersion will facilitate student preparation for the full spectrum of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal care.
  • In Pediatrics, integrates a student into their inpatient practice full time for one week from late July to early October.
  • In Surgery, integrates a student into their inpatient practice – in preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care – full time for three consecutive weeks.

These immersions will likely begin in about August 2020 over a 9-week period. Students may rotate through these experiences in cohorts; e.g. for IM, one third of the class, or 20 students, might be engaged across multiple sites and teams in a given 3-week time period.

LIC Preceptor Responsibilities:

  • Participates actively with the School of Medicine in the site review for clinical training approval.
  • Upholds all School of Medicine policies related to the Learning Environment expectations for medical students.
  • Collaborates with the Clerkship Director to identify patients to assign to students that maximize their opportunity for clinical learning and address the learning objectives for each session.
  • Assigns patients to become a part of the student’s patient panel. The size of the student’s patient panel will be 4-6 patients during Phase 2 and then will continue but taper in Phase 3 (October 2021 – March 2022).
  • Facilitates the student’s participation in the care of their assigned panel of patients whenever possible, in the office and when care extends to other settings (e.g. a specialty appointment, procedure, hospitalization, etc.)
  • Hosts and/or facilitates the student experience when student is following a patient into the clinical teaching faculty member’s setting (e.g. during hospitalization, procedure, or consultation)
  • Observes, provides feedback to, and assesses students in a timely manner in accordance with School of Medicine policy.
  • Reviews and responds to communications from the LIC director, clerkship directors, and LIC coordinator(s) to facilitate meaningful student learning experiences.
  • Communicates with the student’s physician development coach at the SOM at prescribed intervals (e.g. quarterly) and as needed regarding student progress.
  • Responds promptly to requests for information about student performance, including periodic written evaluations.
  • Proactively contacts School of Medicine staff and faculty (e.g., LIC coordinator, clerkship director) as needed to promote student safety and progress.

Minimum Qualifications

  • Unrestricted licensure to practice medicine in the State of Texas without adverse licensure board events
  • Board eligibility or certification in appropriate discipline
  • Active and continuing clinical practice site(s)
  • Excellent interpersonal, communication, and clinical skills
  • Qualify for faculty appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor or higher with the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Experience teaching medical students in a clinical setting
  • Experience and leadership in team-based delivery of health care

Other requirements:

  • Endorse and adhere to the School of Medicine Teacher-Learner Compact [Link]
  • Endorse and adhere to the School of Medicine Learning Environment Policy [Link]
  • Abide by all School of Medicine and university policies and rules of conduct [Link]
  • Apply for and achieve appointment to the faculty of the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine [Link]
  • Engage in faculty development

Sign up to be considered for an LIC Faculty role

https://fwfacultyaffairs.wufoo.com/forms/zkmz5kt1ua50a8/

Electives Faculty

Electives faculty are responsible for the development and delivery of four-week electives rotation for Phase 3 medical students. During the elective rotation, medical students will. All electives require advance approval from the assistant dean for curriculum, the electives director, and the School of Medicine Curriculum Committee.

Sign up to be considered for a Phase 1 or Phase 3 electives teaching role with the School of Medicine https://fwfacultyaffairs.wufoo.com/forms/z1jcex2w14orqx1/

Primary Care LIC Faculty (Phase 1-3):

  • Integrates a student into their practice, as follows:
    • Phase 1: One half day every other week from late July through June, or about 20 half-day sessions (beginning in July 2019)
    • Phase 2: One half day per week from late October through August, or about 40 half-day sessions (beginning in October 2020)
    • Phase 3: One full day (or two half days) per week from October through March, or about 20 full-day sessions (beginning in October 2021)

Ideally, a student begins in Year 1 (e.g. July 2019) and continues with your practice through Year 3 (e.g. March 2022).